Author Archives: John Styles

Everyday Fashion in Early-Modern Europe: Transformations in Textiles, 1500-1750

Click on the Download button below for John Styles’ paper, ‘Everyday Fashion in Early-Modern Europe:Transformations in Textiles, 1500-1750’, presented at the Refashioning the Renaissance Conference ‘Everyday Dress and the Reconstruction of Early Modern Material Culture, 1550-1650’ Aalto University, Finland, 10-11 … Continue reading

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Re-fashioning Industrial Revolution: Fibres, fashion and technical innovation in British cotton textiles, 1630-1780

Click on the Download button below for John Styles’ paper, ‘Re-fashioning Industrial Revolution: Fibres, fashion and technical innovation in British cotton textiles, 1630-1780’, presented at the study week ‘Fashion as an Economic Engine: Process and Product Innovation, Commercial Strategies, Consumer … Continue reading

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“Our traitorous money makers”: the Yorkshire coiners and the law, 1760-83

Open the link below for the final mss. version of ‘“Our traitorous money makers”: the Yorkshire coiners and the law, 1760-83’, subsequently published as chapter 5 in John Brewer and John Styles (eds), An Ungovernable People: The English and their … Continue reading

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Fibres, Yarns and Fabrics: Cotton Textiles in Britain and the Dutch Republic before Mechanisation, 1600-1760

Click on the Download button below for John Styles’ paper ‘Fibres, Yarns and Fabrics: Cotton Textiles in Britain and the Dutch Republic before Mechanisation, 1600-1760’, presented at the workshop ‘Dutch Textiles in Global History: Interconnections of Trade, Design, and Labour, … Continue reading

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The Rise and Fall of the Spinning Jenny

Open the link below for the online version of John Styles’ article, ‘The Rise and Fall of the Spinning Jenny: Domestic Mechanisation in Eighteenth-Century Cotton Spinning’, Textile History, 51 (2020), pp. 1-42. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00404969.2020.1812472

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Robert Allen’s spinning jenny is still broken.

In ‘Spinning their wheels: a reply to Jane Humphries and Benjamin Schneider’, published in Economic History Review online early view in May 2019, Robert Allen once again defends his High Wage Economy explanation of the industrial revolution in textiles. Specifically, … Continue reading

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Spinning little stories about the High Wage Economy.

It’s been fascinating seeing the responses to Judy Stephenson’s post ‘Spinning little stories: Why cotton in the Industrial Revolution was not what you think’ on the Economic History Society’s Long Run blog (https://ehsthelongrun.net/2016/12/01/spinning-little-stories-why-cotton-in-the-industrial-revolution-was-not-what-you-think/). It’s partly about my East Asian Journal … Continue reading

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Robert Allen’s spinning jenny is broken

The late Eric Hobsbawm famously remarked ‘whoever says Industrial Revolution says cotton’. Traditional accounts of the British Industrial Revolution tell the story of an Asian textile – cotton – transformed into a cheap, mass-produced British staple by means of cost-cutting … Continue reading

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Richard Arkwright goes to Germany

I recently visited LVR-Industriemuseum Textilfabrik Cromford, at Ratingen, near Düsseldorf, Germany. The museum is located in the first water-powered cotton spinning mill to be built in continental Europe. It was constructed in 1783-4 by Johann Gottfried Brügelmann, a Wuppertal merchant, to … Continue reading

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Robert and Nathan Hyde pattern book, 1771.

I recently visited Quarry Bank Mill near Wilmslow, Cheshire, one of the early water-powered cotton spinning mills, built on the River Bollin in 1784 to house the mechanical spinning frames invented by Richard Arkwright a decade and a half earlier. … Continue reading

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