People

John Styles, University of Hertfordshire, Project Leader

John Styles, Project Leader

 John Styles is Research Professor in History at the University of Hertfordshire. He joined the university in 2004, after thirteen years as Head of Graduate Studies at the Victoria and Albert Museum. He specializes in the history of early-modern Britain, especially material life, manufacturing, and design. His most recent books are The Dress of the People: Everyday Fashion in Eighteenth-Century England (2007) and Threads of Feeling: The London Foundling Hospital’s Textile Tokens, 1740-1770 (2010). He curated the exhibition ‘Threads of Feeling’, displayed at the London Foundling Museum in 2010-11, the de Witt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum at Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, USA in 2013-14, and online at: www.threadsoffeeling.com

 

David Celetti, University of Padua.

David Celetti, University of Padua.

David Celetti holds a doctorate in Economic and Social History from the University of Verona. His thesis was entitled ‘Hemp in the Venetian Economy of the 16th and 17th centuries’. He specializes in the early-modern European economy, especially proto-industry, agriculture and trade. He has also undertaken oral histories of rural communities in Italy. As Post-Doctoral Research Fellow attached to ‘Spinning in the Era of the Spinning Wheel’ from 2011-12, he researched spinning in continental Europe, especially France, Italy, Germany and the Netherlands. He is currently Research Fellow in Economic History at the University of Padua.

 

Alice Dolan, PhD Researcher

Alice Dolan, PhD Researcher

Alice Dolan studied for her BA in History at Royal Holloway, University of London, followed by the MA in the History of Design at the Royal College of Art / Victoria and Albert Museum. She has also worked as a research assistant/intern at the Victoria and Albert and Ashmolean Museums, and as research assistant on the ‘Pockets of History’ project. The thesis she researched and wrote as PhD Researcher attached to ‘Spinning in the Era of the Spinning Wheel’ from 2011-14 is entitled ‘The Fabric of Life: Linen and Life Cycle in English Daily Life, 1678-1810’. She also blogs about her research at alicedolan.wordpress.com